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Tagore Translations

Robert Burns & Tagore in Harmony

A translation of Purano Sei Diner (1885), Tagore’s youthful adaptation of Robert’s Burn’s Auld Lang Syne(1788) to an Indian context.

Tagore’s song sung by Bengali legendary singer, Debabrata Biswas
Can Old Days Ever be Forgot? 

Can old days ever be forgot, O my friend! 
The things we saw, we shared together, can they be forgot?
Come, my friend, come once again into my heart.
We’ll talk of our joys and sorrows, and we’ll relax. 
We have swung, picked flowers in the dawn, 
Played the flute, sung together under the bokul*. 
Oh, we parted in between, scattered here and there. 
Now that we’ve met again, my friend, come into my hearth.

*Bokul is a tree with fragrant flowers, commonly known as medlar in English.

We present here the version created by Robert Burns based on an old Scottish song. It is popularly sung during the new year.

Auld Lang Syne
By Robert Burns

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne!

     Chorus:
For auld lang syne, my dear,
     For auld lang syne.
     We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,
     For auld lang syne.

And surely ye'll be your pint stowp!
And surely I'll be mine!
And we'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

     Chorus

We twa hae run about the braes,
And pou'd the gowans fine;
But we've wander'd mony a weary fit,
Sin' auld lang syne.

     Chorus

We twa hae paidl'd in the burn,
Frae morning sun till dine;
But seas between us braid hae roar'd
Sin' auld lang syne.

     Chorus

And there's a hand, my trusty fere!
And gie's a hand o' thine!
And we'll tak a right gude-willie waught,
For auld lang syne.

     Chorus
Auld Lang Syne in Scottish and English

(Translated for Borderless Journal  by Mitali Chakravarty, edited by Sohana Manzoor and Anasuya Bhar.)

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PLEASE NOTE: ARTICLES CAN ONLY BE REPRODUCED IN OTHER SITES WITH DUE ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TO BORDERLESS JOURNAL

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